West Virginia Bird Discovery Weekend at Blackwater Falls State Park, June 1-3, 2018

A wonderful way to experience and learn about WV’s mountain birds in late spring! 

Jan and I will be the leaders at this birding weekend.

Friday afternoon – Beginning Birding and Beyond — newer birders will get many helpful ideas and more experienced birders will refresh and renew their birding skillset.

Friday evening – Wood Warblers of West Virginia — this program emphasizes identification of the group of birds that most birders find the most difficult to identify and highlights their natural history.

IMG_3309

Mourning Warbler in Fernow Experimental Forest (Photo (c) Jan Runyan)

Saturday – Olsen Fire Tower/Fernow Experimental Forest Field Trip – a host of warblers can be expected on this field trip including: Northern Parula, Black-throated Green, Black-and-white , Black-throated Blue, Magnolia, Yellow-rumped, Canada, Chestnut-sided, American Redstart, Common Yellowthroat, Louisiana Waterthrush and Ovenbird. Also possible are Northern Waterthrush, Mourning Warbler and several others. Expect to hear the beautiful songs of the Wood Thrush, Hermit Thrush and Veery as well as many other birds.

AMKEs

Adult female American Kestrel and 2-week-old babies inside nesting cavity (Photos (c) Bill Beatty)

Saturday evening – Raptors of West Virginia (except owls) – this program covers both sight and song identification. Confused by the falcons, accipiters and buteos? Well, so are the experts at times. We will study what is necessary to make a positive identification while in the field.

willow and alder

Alder Flycatcher (L) and Willow Flycatcher (R) along Freeland Trail (Photos (c) Jan Runyan)

Sunday – Canaan Valley Field Trip – areas we will visit include the wetlands of Freeland Trail, the open meadows, wood edges and deciduous forests of Forest Service Road 80, and the Red Spruce woods where the road ends on Dolly Sods.  Because of the large elevation change, many bird species could possibly be heard and seen including Bobolink, several sparrow species, Northern Harrier and American Kestrel in the lowlands; forest interior breeders such as Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Ovenbird and Hooded Warbler on the way up; and mountaintop species such as Blackburnian Warbler and Golden-crowned Kinglet at the top. Along the way we will listen for niche birds such as Canada Warbler, Winter Wren and several thrush species including the Swainson’s Thrush.

Additional information and registration: https://wvstateparks.com/event/west-virginia-bird-discovery-weekend-blackwater-falls/

Friendly Faces

This spring is not really spring, yet.  Winter doesn’t want to let go and keeps sending more snow and cold temperatures.  The calendar tells me it’s April 9th, but when I look outside it seems more like January 99th.

I enjoy rambling through woodlands looking for early spring wildflowers.  Every year at this time I see the flowers of Bloodroot, Hepatica, Rue Anemone, Twinleaf and more, except for this year.  Everything is late, at least their flowers are.  The plants are there, but the flowers are waiting.  Being the reproductive part of the plant, flowers are susceptible to extreme cold and since a plant’s sole purpose in life is to reproduce itself, if the flowers freeze, there will be no fruits or seeds — no reproduction.

Even though I knew the flowers wouldn’t be there, I decided to take a walk in a nearby 50 acre woodland and I was greeted with a great many friendly leafy faces.  Having hiked the ridges and valleys throughout West Virginia so many times during all seasons, I am familiar with many plants in all their stages of growth.  And I did see the flowers — but just in my mind.  Only seeing the leaves, I was able to view the flowers imprinted in my memories.  And not just spring flowers.  I saw the leafy beginnings of summer wildflowers as well and then viewed their flowers in my mind.  Here are a few of the leafy friends I saw.  The flowers that will appear later are on the right.

Tall A.

Tall Agrimony (Agrimonia gryposepala) (Photos (c) Bill Beatty)

 

A Buttercup

Aborted Buttercup/Kidneyleaf Crowfoot  (Ranunculus abortivus) (Photos (c) Bill Beatty)

 

False Mer

False Mermaidweed (Floerkea proserpinacoides) (Photos (c) Bill Beatty)

 

Heal a

Heal All/Selfheal/Bumblebee Weed (Prunella vulgaris) (Photos (c) Bill Beatty)

 

m apple

Mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum) (Photos (c) Bill Beatty)

 

M E Chick

Mouse-ear Chickweed (Cerastium vulgatum) (Photos (c) Bill Beatty)

 

H Woodmint

Hairy Wood Mint (Blephilia hirsute) (Photos (c) Bill Beatty)

 

sweet cicely

Smooth Sweet Cicely/Aniseroot (Osmorhiza longistylis) (Photos (c) Bill Beatty)

 

White-flowered Leafcup

White-flowered Leafcup (Polymnia canadensis) (Photos (c) Bill Beatty)

 

P D Nettle

Purple Dead Nettle (Lamium purpureum) (Photos (c) Bill Beatty)

 

S W Violet

Striped White Violet (Viola striata) (Photos (c) Bill Beatty)

 

Great Chickweed

Great Chickweed/Star Chickweed (Stellaria pubera) (Photos (c) Bill Beatty)

 

It is important to go out in Nature as often as possible.  If you do, you will soon begin to recognize the friendly faces of so many more special friends.

 

Wildflowers and Weeds for Master Naturalist, April 28, 2018, 9 am – Noon

This is a beautiful time of year to be in the woods!  Join me to learn about the incredible spring ephemeral wildflowers and those things we call “weeds”.  This program is open to the public, but you must pre-register.

Left to right… Sharplobe Hepatica, Blue-eyed Mary and Bloodroot (All photos (c) Bill Beatty)

Learn the major groups and important families of flowering plants.  Discover basic terms for describing flowering plants as well as how to collect and preserve plants.  Identifying flowering plants using field guides and keys will also be covered, as well as approaches to further study, including helpful references.  This class will meet at the zoo, then drive to the woods surrounding West Liberty University.  Participants will provide their own transportation to West Liberty.